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CereScan on Forbes: What Radiology Tech Can Learn From Baseball’s Electronic Strike Zone Debate 

Last baseball season when the electronic strike zone idea was once again hotly debated, the striking similarities between the issues baseball and radiology face – accuracy, objectivity, efficiency – became glaringly obvious.

The idea of using technology to increase game consistency and accuracy is a controversial one. The same could be said of the use of automated technologies in radiology. Radiologists fear the introduction of automation and machine learning technologies could make their jobs extinct. However, striking the right balance between human intellect and technology advancements is key to a more successful future.

Whether you’re a physician or an umpire, machine intelligence can provide the information needed to make better, faster decisions. In his latest Forbes.com article, John Kelley, CEO of CereScan and notable tech industry leader, takes a deep dive into how together human and machine have the potential to change the world of healthcare, baseball and beyond.

What Radiology Tech Can Learn From Baseball’s Electronic Strike Zone Debate

Forbes.comJohn Kelley Forbes CereMetrix CereScan – Growing up in St. Louis — arguably the home of the best fanbase in baseball — I quickly became an avid student and player of America’s favorite pastime. Every guy I grew up with playing baseball enjoyed dissecting the technicalities of the game and all the moving parts that come together to form each and every play.

Take the pitcher and the hitter, for example. The matchup would seem to be a simple process of throwing a ball in different ways and having a hitter attempt to successfully make contact. In reality, there is a very complex set of non-verbal processes communicated to each player in the field before any pitch is thrown… Read the full article.

Healthspan CereScan John Kelley

How to Close the Gap Between Healthy Aging and Growing Old

Healthspan CereScan John Kelley

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Living forever has always been a dream of mankind. Since the 20th century, we’ve increased life expectancy by 30 years from 49 to 79, but are we living those additional years to the fullest?

Americans are consuming healthcare services at an increasingly intense rate the older we become. While U.S. residents over the age of 65 only made up 14% of the population in 2012, they accounted for 34% of healthcare-related spending, according to a 2015 National Bureau of Economic Research report, titled “Medical Spending of The U.S. Elderly.” Additionally, medical expenses for the elderly more than double between the ages of 70 and 90, with the average amount spent on healthcare exceeding $25,000 annually for those aged 90 or above.

From dementia to diabetes to heart disease, these are the conditions likely to take up most our last years on Earth. The result is the mindset that growing old is often seen as a period of diminishment, not opportunity. While the medical community has made significant advances to help treat these chronic conditions, more measures can and should be implemented to delay their onsets.

Prevention vs. Treatment: Fee-for-Service Medicine Affects Patient Health

Basic science tells us eating right, exercising and abstaining from drug use will generally lead to a longer, healthier life and possibly stave off common conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and heart disease. However, very little financial incentives are in place to encourage this type of preventable behavior. The healthcare system doesn’t invest much into patient education and primary care office visits bill for very little.

Instead, insurance companies reimburse doctors based on procedures. While rewarding healthcare providers for each step they take to make a patient better may seem admirable on the surface, it creates a culture focused more on treating than preventing.

In a 2014 study titled, “Do Physicians’ Financial Incentives Affect Medical Treatment and Patient Health,” researchers found reimbursement changes often lead physicians to adjust treatment patterns, especially among elective procedures.

It doesn’t have to be this way. What if the healthcare community refocused its efforts on preserving the physical, social and emotional dimensions that define a healthy life?Aging is still inevitable, but shortening the decline that occurs near the end of life could maximize the time individuals are physically and mentally connected and empowered.

Intelligent Information Sharing Can Lengthen Our Healthspans

There is no one-solution-fits all in the battle to extend healthy life expectancies, but the utilization and sharing of medical data can help. Every time a doctor sees a patient, he or she is collecting an extensive amount of healthcare data, such as patient’s history, symptoms, imaging and lab tests. This data is then used to arrive at an optimal treatment decision, rarely to prevent.

Eliminating medical silos and connecting them with the latest in intelligent systems could play a major role in prediction and prevention of disease. Data can provide medical practitioners with the information they need to build better patient profiles to more effectively predict, diagnose and possibly delay the onset of disease.

Wearable devices and smartphone apps are taking steps to use predictive analytics to improve patient care. For instance, eCare21 is a remote patient-monitoring system that collects thousands of pieces of health data from thousands of senior citizens. The company’s platform uses smartphones, sensors and over 200 wearable and in-home devices to monitor and securely share key digital health parameters, such as glucose, blood pressure, sleep efficiency, heart rate, physical activity and more in an effort to provide more proactive care.

Singapore, named third in the world for life expectancy by the World Health Organization,  is also using data to take more preventative measures to delay aging. The county’s Centre for Healthy Ageing at the National University Health System is collaborating with other global institutions to compare data and perform studies to test different aging interventions.

Life insurance companies are also stepping up by using policyholder health data to offer incentives. John Hancock partnered with Vitality to integrate wellness benefits with life insurance products by collecting data from activities policy holders do to stay healthy, such as: meeting step goals tracked through a free Fitbit®; getting annual health screenings; staying tobacco-free; and more. Annual premiums are reduced and rewards and discounts are achieved when personalized health goals are met.

While there is no need for a national database of all the medical and personal information to provide a complete picture of America’s aging population, public health officials and other stakeholders can still use the data available to analyze patterns and compare similar patients. By deploying new technologies, sharing data and implementing more incentives for preventative care, we can close the gap between healthy aging and growing old. After all, each of us desires to live a quality of life we always envisioned as long as we can.

John Kelley CEO of CereScan

CereScan’s Kelley To Share His Unique Insights Into Unlocking The Mysteries Of The Human Brain As Panelist At Singularity University’s Global Forum

John Kelley, Chairman and CEO of CereScan®, will inject his inimitable style and passion for the plight of sufferers of chronic brain disorders when he addresses Singularity University’s Global Forum as a member of the Breakthrough Braintech Panel on August 15, 2017 in San Francisco. Kelley will join other innovators in discussing the connection between our biology and our inner selves and finding ways to exponentially improve our mental health.

The Global Forum is Singularity University’s flagship event and boasts a world-class collection of thinkers, leaders and doers who have come together to educate, influence and inspire others on the front lines of technical innovation.

“The chance to meet and collaborate with so many individuals who are trailblazers and barrier busters in the fields of technology and mental health is certainly my honor and privilege,” said Kelley. “The Global Forum provides a unique opportunity for us front line warriors to exchange ideas on emerging technologies and help change the direction and pace of global health.”

Featured prominently in Kelley’s presentation is CereScan’s recently unveiled CereMetrix® data analytics platform, which provides decision support and cohort analysis to medical professionals and researchers involved in diagnosing and identifying abnormalities in the human brain. CereMetrix® is a multi-variable search engine and correlative tool to support research and diagnostic applications. Through its patented neuroimaging database systems and methods, the platform is designed to accelerate the accurate and effective diagnosis of complex brain-related disorders, improving treatment and outcomes for patients.

The key attributes of CereMetrix include:

  • Unique, medical database for diagnosing complex brain-related disorders based on HD functional imagery and voxel level analysis
  • Provide a highly accurate, statistically valid standardized normative dataset for comparison and correlation of related symptomology
  • Proprietary software, scalable platform, with advanced intelligence and predicative analytics capabilities
  • Robust capabilities and easy to use
  • Accelerate accurate and effective diagnosis across the range of complex brain disorders
  • Enable appropriate diagnosis and treatment

About CereScan®

CereScan® combines state-of-the-art brain imaging technologies with a patient-centered model of care to provide the highest level of neuro-diagnostics available. CereScan utilizes state-of-the-art gamma camera technology, new generation imaging software and a proprietary process to produce comprehensive medical reports including voxel level images of brain function and physiology. Our functional brain imaging technologies are the most sophisticated in the world today. Additional information about the company is available at https://cerescan.com.

CereScan® and CereMetrix® are registered trademark of CereHealth Corp.

Contacts

RAM Communications
Ron Margulis, 908-272-3930
ron@rampr.com

CereScan’s Latest Patent for its Neuroimaging Database Now Covers All Brain Activity Measurement Methods

CereMetrix CereScan Patent

In response to an application filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, CereScan® has broadened the parameters on its automated diagnostic assistance and intelligent support system, CereMetrix®, which uses quantitative measurements to assist in the diagnosis and study of complex brain disorders.  Through award of a second patent, the company may now claim exclusive use of its neuroimaging database systems and methods in the measurement of all types of brain activity.  The patent expands CereScan’s intellectual property and use of its wholly owned data warehouse, known to be the most comprehensive store of functional brain imaging data, associated patient demographic, clinical information and biomarkers worldwide.

“CereScan® is transforming the future of advanced brain diagnostics and use of intelligent learning to benefit those suffering from and studying complex brain disorders,” said John Kelley, CEO and Chairman of CereScan®. “The expansion of our patent allows us to apply key learnings to all manners of brain measurement, and vastly expands the potential for advancements in brain science using technology.”

Read More: CereScan Taps The Ohio State University to Advance Functional Brain Diagnostic System

Headquartered in Denver, CereScan® uses its patented methods, combining patient-clinical information, functional brain imaging and advanced processing software to help medical professionals identify abnormal brain physiology and activity using correlative data and pattern matching contained within its extensive data warehouse.  Through the application of technology to traditional medical practice, CereScan® has assumed a leadership role in advancing precision brain diagnostics and science.  Its first patent was awarded in September of 2014, and allowed for exclusive utilization of it systems and methods under more limited claims.

CereScan® is uniquely positioned to capitalize on a planned release of CereMetrix®, its MAaS (Medical Analytics as a Service) platform in 2017.  Its patented technology is considered by industry insiders to be a positive disruptor in the field of diagnostic radiology.  CereScan’s MAaS product suite incorporated into its CereMetrix® offering is being labeled as revolutionary, based on early feedback from Radiologists, Neurologists, and Psychiatrists who have had a chance to experiment with early release versions.

About CereScan® 
CereScan® combines state-of-the-art brain imaging technologies with a patient centered model of care to provide the highest level of neurodiagnostics anywhere. Using quantitative functional brain imaging, advanced imaging software, and an extensive library of clinical data, the CereScan medical team provides physicians with unmatched objective diagnostic information. CereScan helps patients and their physicians better understand the neurological basis of their conditions. In a variety of legal settings, CereScan provides unbiased evidence to attorneys and their clients regarding traumatic and toxic brain injuries. For researchers, CereScan provides independent pre- and post-treatment measures of organic changes in the brain along with measures of symptoms related to the brain disorder of interest. For more information, please call (866) 722-4806 or visit http://www.CereScan.com. Connect with CereScan on Twitter @CereScan and on Facebook at Facebook.com/CereScan.

About CereMetrix®

CereMetrix® is an advanced healthcare analytics ecosystem that provides radiologists, practitioners and researchers with precise data about their patient’s brain health. Each new patient’s data will be compared to a library of patients with similar brain patterns, medical histories, and clinical symptoms. The unique brain diagnostic system and ever-expanding data warehouse includes over 7,000 scan encounters, including patients’ medical histories, family histories, symptoms, prior treatments, incoming diagnoses, outgoing diagnoses, and brain scans, among other data points. Each scan is composed of over 262,000 data points that measure activity levels in up to 160 brain regions derived from comparisons to normative data.