John Kelley Forbes CereMetrix CereScan

CereScan on Forbes: What Radiology Tech Can Learn From Baseball’s Electronic Strike Zone Debate 

Last baseball season when the electronic strike zone idea was once again hotly debated, the striking similarities between the issues baseball and radiology face – accuracy, objectivity, efficiency – became glaringly obvious.

The idea of using technology to increase game consistency and accuracy is a controversial one. The same could be said of the use of automated technologies in radiology. Radiologists fear the introduction of automation and machine learning technologies could make their jobs extinct. However, striking the right balance between human intellect and technology advancements is key to a more successful future.

Whether you’re a physician or an umpire, machine intelligence can provide the information needed to make better, faster decisions. In his latest Forbes.com article, John Kelley, CEO of CereScan and notable tech industry leader, takes a deep dive into how together human and machine have the potential to change the world of healthcare, baseball and beyond.

What Radiology Tech Can Learn From Baseball’s Electronic Strike Zone Debate

Forbes.comJohn Kelley Forbes CereMetrix CereScan – Growing up in St. Louis — arguably the home of the best fanbase in baseball — I quickly became an avid student and player of America’s favorite pastime. Every guy I grew up with playing baseball enjoyed dissecting the technicalities of the game and all the moving parts that come together to form each and every play.

Take the pitcher and the hitter, for example. The matchup would seem to be a simple process of throwing a ball in different ways and having a hitter attempt to successfully make contact. In reality, there is a very complex set of non-verbal processes communicated to each player in the field before any pitch is thrown… Read the full article.

CereScan on Forbes.com: Using Data Analytics to Fight the Opioid Crisis

The opioid crisis statistics are alarming: Drug overdoses, most of which are related to opioids, killed over 64,000 people in the United States last year — an increase of 21% over 2015. Disturbing as those numbers are, understanding the data behind opioid addiction, and analyzing the overwhelming information being collected is critical to fighting the drug crisis.

In the article title “Using Big Data Medical Analytics to Address the Opioid Crisis,” CereScan CEO, John Kelley, discusses how data analytics can and must become a key component in the effort to end the opioid epidemic.

“We’ve all seen the statistics: Drug overdoses, most of which are related to opioids, killed over 64,000 people in the United States last year — an increase of 21% over 2015, according to the CDC. The New York Times just reported that fentanyl has overtaken the top spot from heroin as the leading cause of these deaths. Almost as chilling, there are an estimated 2 million prescription opioid addicts, putting a squeeze on the economy to the tune of more than $75 billion annually.

The national opioid crisis is a dilemma of dichotomies. There are challenges with both prescription and illicit drugs. The solutions must consist of efforts that realistically can reduce the number of people who become addicts in the first place, as well as cure those who do…”

Read the full article on Forbes.com

 

Just Like Wine, No Two Brains are Alike

Most physicians I know believe in the health properties of wine when taken in moderation. It improves stress levels, lowers risk of stroke and, depending on the research you read, may even help with arterial sclerosis. If nothing else, it helps doctors relax and gives them something other than medicine to talk about.

Wine was central to my thesis when I recently participated in Singularity University’s Global Forum, a world-class collection of thinkers, leaders and doers who educate, influence and inspire other on the front lines of technical innovation. I was a member of the Breakthrough Panel, which included other leaders in neuroscience.

I used an analogy to show how, like the human brain, no two vintages of wine are the same but they do have similarities that connect them in a variety of ways. An experienced sommelier is trained to pick up on the subtle differences between wines, just like a physician is trained to identify the subtle differences between medical conditions.

Addressing the uniqueness and complexity in identifying abnormalities in the human brain, which has been greatly enhanced through the use of breakthrough technology and advanced data analytics, is much like addressing the subtleties of different wines. Instead of an aficionado using his or her trained nose and palate, doctors and other medical specialists need to apply new technologies to collect data about traumas, symptoms, imaging, genomics and more on one side, and help deliver faster and more accurate diagnoses for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s to strokes.

I cited recent literature and use cases, showing the power of data in its objective measurement and predictive capabilities. Put simply, biomedical programs have a treasure trove of data that can be mined to assist in the identification of conditions and the subsequent prescription of therapies. because of big data analytics, physicians can know dramatically more about their patients and directly translate that knowledge into improved decision making and results.

The bottom line from the Global Forum is that collaboration and data sharing drives progress and innovation in the medical fields and beyond. For the wine lover, this means a future of good drinks and even better medicine.

John A. Kelley, Jr., is Chairman and CEO of CereScan, a functional brain diagnostics company headquartered in Denver.

 

CereScan in-network insurance

CereScan is Now In-Network With Anthem Blue Cross

Got you covered

We are proud to announce that all brain diagnostic services offered at CereScan’s Colorado location are now covered in-network by Anthem Blue Cross and all Blue Cross affiliates. It is now easier than ever to get the answers that you or a loved one deserve.

At CereScan, it’s important for us to make our brain diagnostic services available to those who need them. That’s why we will be continuing to expand our in-network coverage. If you currently have insurance that isn’t in-network, it could be soon.

If you have not found answers to your concerns and are still interested in how this diagnostic information might be life changing, please contact us using our toll-free number (866) 722-4806, or fill out our contact form.  

We work with variety of health insurance plans and can help determine if your current insurance policy may cover this procedure.  No-interest payment plans are available if insurance is not an option.

Non-Colorado residents can also take advantage of in-network coverage! Call today to speak to our one of our patient care coordinators to learn how.

Phone Number: 866-722-4806

Email: pcc@cerescan.com