World Entrepreneur Forum

CereScan to Present During World Entrepreneur Forum

World Entrepreneur Forum

Steve Warnecke, President of CereHealth Corp., parent company of CereScan®, will be presenting the company’s brain data analytics platform, CereMetrix® at the World Entrepreneur Forum in Vancouver, BC on July 14, 2017.

The conference, hosted by Venture Development Canucks in partnership with UBC, is focused on “Finding the Next Edison” through its invitation to fast growth innovative companies with cutting edge technologies, who will be presenting to international venture capitalists and business strategists.

CereMetrix® is a brain-focused medical analytics platform that may accelerate the accurate and effective diagnosis of complex brain-related disorders to improve treatment and outcomes for patients.

“The opportunity to present our story and CereMetrix’s evolution at the World Entrepreneur Forum is an important step in gaining international exposure and access to global markets through an audience of recognized business leaders and strategists,” expressed Mr. Warnecke.  “I’m honored to have been invited, and excited to explore business development opportunities with this esteemed group of Canadian and multi-national trailblazers in business and innovation.”

About CereScan

CereScan® combines state-of-the-art brain imaging technologies with a patient-centered model of care to provide the highest level of neuro-diagnostics available. CereScan® utilizes state-of-the-art gamma camera technology, new generation imaging software and a proprietary process to produce comprehensive medical reports including voxel level images of brain function and physiology. Our functional brain imaging technologies are the most sophisticated in the world today. Additional information about the company is available at https://cerescan.com.

For more information on CereMetrix® visit http://ceremetrix.io/ , or contact us through hello@ceremetrix.io or by calling (855)-838-2241.

CereScan® and CereMetrix® are registered trademarks of CereHealth Corp.

Medical Icons

What the Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods tells us about medical technology

Medical Icons

I’m a big believer in learning business lessons wherever and whenever I can. I may hear a speaker suggest something or read a column that gets me thinking of how to apply that idea or concept to our business. Even when the issue is clearly ions away from our primary interests, I can almost always find a parable or analogy that brings the learning back to what’s in front of me.

Even so, many might say it’s too far a stretch for me to see a lesson applicable to the medical device industry, or even the broader healthcare sector, in the Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods in June. Let me explain why this transaction actually teaches a critical lesson for all of us concerned with bringing innovation to the world’s doctors, nurses and, most importantly, patients.

AI Can Do to Healthcare What Amazon Did to the Publishing Industry

Beyond the almost cliché role of disruptor, which it has been perfecting since the days the company started changing how and where books are sold, Amazon is also showing that it can cross channels to make them more efficient for the ultimate consumer. What Jeff Bezos did by forcing publishers, authors, and everybody else along the book supply chain to cut their costs, he is now attempting to do with groceries.  The outcome for food manufacturers may be as existentially challenging as it was for book sellers.

Apply this lesson of disintermediation and productivity enhancement to the healthcare industry with technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) and you have the colliding of disruptors that simultaneously knock existing companies off of their current models.  This has the immediate impact of propelling the patient or end user to the front of the line when it comes to improved diagnosis and ultimately improved outcomes.  With AI and advanced machine learning algorithms, improved healthcare will result from the ability to instantaneously reveal intelligent information from totally different data sets.  For example, the marrying of detailed, pattern matching information from Neurology, Radiology and Psychiatry may very well improve optimal clinical and medical solutions for patients.

The AI market for healthcare applications, which is expected to double every two years for the next decade, should also result in reduced treatment costs and the elimination of unnecessary hospital procedures. Soon enough, chronic conditions like cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and chronic traumatic brain injuries will be diagnosed in minutes.  This will be accomplished by using AI applications systems that identify and compare all available characteristics in the patient’s medical history, testing, scanning, blood markers and other available information.  If that’s not an industry disruptor, I don’t know what one is.

The primary question to companies facing this onslaught, like those now assessing the combination of Amazon and Whole Foods, is what can I do to keep up?  A recent column on the Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods at Forbes.com captures this perfectly, particularly a few sentences toward the end; “Innovators have already been using Big Data, AI and ML. And if you’re hearing about them now, it might be too late.

John A. Kelley, Jr., is Chairman and CEO of CereScan, a functional brain diagnostics company headquartered in Denver.

 

Medical innovation and progress don’t have to stop under tight federal budgets

 

Budget Planning

There has been a lot of discussion about Pres. Trump’s first budget submission, particularly in healthcare channels, leading to more questions than answers. Will Medicaid really be cut by billions of dollars? Are certain research programs and pharmaceutical regulations destined for the scrap heap? Will the CDC and NIH have their budgets slashed? The list goes on.

There is an excellent article in The Atlantic that provides insight into the impact of the budget on healthcare, much of which is negative for many of us in the sector. Instead of reviewing the downside, I want to focus on the opportunities and trend away from simply piling on regarding the issue the proposed budget cuts will create. These opportunities arise from having to make difficult choices based on fewer resources available to address specific challenges. It may sound counter-intuitive, but those choices over diminished fund allocations can actually lead to dramatic advancement of research in health and diagnostics.

How?

The traditional path to innovation in healthcare is for researchers to receive money from the government and other sources, develop a solution to a specific medical challenge, seek approval from governmental bodies and then endeavor to commercialize the pharmaceutical device or process. The creative way to bring innovations to market is to secure private sector funding, then compliant testing and ultimately commercialization. This new approach is obtainable because technology has advanced to the point where data can be shared across boundaries.  This sharing accelerates innovations that are works of collaboration between many different companies and organizations. This is exactly what investors want in a business model, and has been successfully used in many industries.

The healthcare sector has operated with a margin of error that can now be reduced by deploying the latest in information systems technologies.  These new advancements enhance an organization’s ability to move new products and procedures through to commercialization more effectively. Data analytics is a great example of technology that has consistently been advancing to the point where stakeholders can fully coordinate intelligent information to better understand the needs of each patient. These stakeholders can realistically implement artificial intelligence, machine learning and other analytic technologies to fill the void and continue to be proactive in helping drive that more comprehensive view of the patient.

This research to personalize the care process is more important than ever because any potential cuts at the federal level will require more efficient use of treatment resources. If doctors can combine data sources at the point of care delivery to more precisely and immediately diagnose and treat illnesses, they can potentially save billions of dollars a year for the healthcare system.

As Harvard Business School’s Clayton Christiansen has said, machine learning is going to happen in a big way in the healthcare provider channel whether the channel likes it or not. The change will happen either through disruptive innovation, a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves up market, or through a more gradual evolution that is spurred on by existing stakeholders responding to the changing marketplace. Given those potential budget cuts, stakeholders should plan for disruptions but innovation that will be positive for the healthcare industry.

John A. Kelley, Jr., is Chairman and CEO of CereScan, a functional brain diagnostics company headquartered in Denver.

CereScan® Demos CereMetrix® at Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Annual Conference

3D Graphics

Denver (June 19, 2017) – CereScan®, a leading provider of neuro-diagnostics solutions, presented the newest features, capabilities and use cases of its CereMetrix® platform during the Society for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) Annual Conference at the Colorado Convention Center last week. CereMetrix® is a patented, statistically-correlated, normative and scalable medical database designed to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of the human brain.

CereMetrix® will provide the healthcare community with the most robust resource on conditions like traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury, Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias, PTSD, bipolar disorder, ADHD, anxiety, autism and depression. It’s a brain focused medical analytics platform that may accelerate the accurate and effective diagnosis of complex brain-related disorders to improve treatment and outcomes for patients.

“We see SNMMI members as core stakeholders for CereMetrix® and wanted to engage them to both share our vision and get feedback on the solution. I’m happy to report that the response was overwhelmingly favorable and we now feel that we are innovating in the right direction,” said John Kelley Jr., Chairman and CEO of CereScan.

The key attributes of CereMetrix® include:

  • Unique, medical database for diagnosing complex brain-related disorders based on HD functional imagery and voxel level analysis
  • Provide a highly accurate, statistically valid standardized normative dataset for comparison and correlation of related symptomology
  • Proprietary software, scalable platform, with advanced intelligence and predicative analytics capabilities
  • Robust capabilities and easy to use
  • Accelerate accurate and effective diagnosis across the range of complex brain disorders
  • Enable appropriate diagnosis and treatment

 

About CereScan®
CereScan® combines state-of-the-art brain imaging technologies with a patient-centered model of care to provide the highest level of neuro-diagnostics available. CereScan® utilizes state-of-the-art gamma camera technology, new generation imaging software and a proprietary process to produce comprehensive medical reports including voxel level images of brain function and physiology. Our functional brain imaging technologies are the most sophisticated in the world today. Additional information about the company is available at https://cerescan.com.

CereScan® and CereMetrix® are registered trademark of CereHealth Corp.